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Queensland Specialist Disability Accommodation complete

22 Dec 2021

Queensland Specialist Disability Accommodation complete

A high-grade Specialist Disability Accommodation (SDA) project in Marsden has reached completion, joining the string of Queensland developments bolstering national SDA housing supply.  

Developed by investLogan in partnership with Blue CHP and Compass Housing Services, the project will add to Queensland’s portfolio of SDA housing which is leading the way nationally.

investLogan Chair Steve Greenwood said the Brandon Street project was a response to the 14,000-place demand for SDA dwellings in Australia.  

“Where there is national demand there is an opportunity to make an impact locally, and the statistics show a significant need for high-quality SDA housing for Logan people on NDIS plans,” Mr Greenwood said.

“investLogan is actively responding to the community housing need locally by creating community homes that support the tenants, not just physically, but by allowing them to feel connected to the local community.

“Marsden plays a big part in contributing to the broader investLogan strategy to drive investment in the region that benefits both the community and our shareholder.”

According to a 2021 SDA supply report from Housing Hub and Summer Foundation, the project was part of one of the 63 SDA places under development in the Logan Beaudesert region, one of the top performing regions for SDA development in Queensland.

City of Logan Deputy Mayor and Division five Councillor, Cr Jon Raven said Logan is an ideal location for SDA approved community housing developments due to its locality and its large blocks of land.   

“Logan is leading the way in delivering housing for people with all abilities, and we are proud to announce the opening of another project that enhances liveability for our residents,” Cr Raven said.

“SDA housing of this standard requires large blocks of land to cater for adequate backyard space, wider hallways and higher ceilings, which we can accommodate in Logan. 

“This project has been perfectly balanced when it comes to the SDA requirements, the needs of the residents and the commercial viability of an investment.”

The two, three-bedroom dwellings have been designed and constructed to the High Physical Support SDA Design Category and feature a generous front and back yard space.   

Constructed to this standard, the houses can be used as National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) housing for up to six people and provide facilities for a Supported Independent Living (SIL) Provider to be present on site.

Mr Greenwood said the Marsden Project is unique in nature, breaking the stigma around community housing design and its street appeal. 

“This particular design is quite unique in that normal SDA facilities are not of this nature,” he said.

“A focal point on the front and backyard and alfresco area allows them to feel like they’re at a recreational park in their own home. They’re out in their backyard, out in the community, doing activities in their yard, so that outdoor alfresco area is critical,” Mr Greenwood said.

Compass Housing will provide ongoing tenancy and property management of the new dwellings.

Operations Manager of Specialist Services Larissa Bridge said Compass was proud to be involved in such an important project.

“Of all the flaws in Australia’s housing system, the lack of suitable accommodation for people with a disability is among the worst,” Ms Bridge said.

“Everyone has a right to live as part of the community and to have choice and control over their own housing,” she said.

“SDA projects like this one help make that possible.” 

The Marsden project is one of the many SDA housing options Compass provides people in NSW, Queensland and Victoria.

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